No, I’m not referring to emojis or emoticons that are already taking us back to Egyptian hieroglyphics.

I’m referring to the new ways to react, on Facebook. The Like now has 5 more for company.

These.

It’s early days to delve into the deeper implications for marketers and agencies with these new ways people can react to their posts. Facebook has started showing individual Reaction numbers on a per post basis in Facebook Insights, but there are no ways to look at Page-level numbers. Also, brands cannot yet use the new Reactions to target ads.

However, Facebook Reactions throws up a lot of intriguing issues that our society could do without. Here are some to begin with. Now, these may sound frivolous and funny, but I think they are imminent!

1. Scene in a corporate boardroom

Brand manager: “Boss, we did really well with our last campaign on Facebook! It got 789 Likes, 2,287 Yays and 324 Wows!”
Boss: “But why does it have 1,453 Sads and 954 Angrys? You mean we paid money to Facebook to promote our campaign and we got this in return?”

2. Phone conversation between 2 friends

Friend #1: “Dude, what the heck?”
Friend #2: “What happened man?”
F1: “You just Liked that pun of mine?”
F2: “Oh yeah, it was nice! You called me to just ask that?”
F1: “No. I called to ask why you didn’t Love it?”
F2: “Well, I did Like it, didn’t I? “
F1: “You see, F3 Loved it! So much for our friendship!”
F2: “But, but…”
F1: [Disconnects call]

3. Frenzied meeting at a superstar’s fan association

Head of Superstar actor’s rabid fans association: “Friends! We have an important assignment for tonight!”
Rabid fans: “Anything for our dear star!”
Head: “Remember… at 12am tonight, that other actor’s new film teaser is releasing! We have got to show our might!”
Rabid fans: “Just tell us what to do and we will all do it immediately!”
Head: “Go to the Facebook post announcing the new teaser and click on Angry… all of you!”
Rabid fans: “But, is that ‘angry about the content of the post’ or ‘angry at the person posting it’?”
Head: “Aah, that’s the beauty of Facebook! There are no such nuances on Facebook! Let us build a new meaning to the Angry button and use it to our advantage!”
Rabid fans: “Deal! Here we come Angry!!”

(Replace superstar’s fans with devotees of a Godman, or followers of a political party, and we have a fantastic new problem in our hands!)

4. Phone conversation between a person and his ex-boss!

Tring tring!
“Hello?”
“Hey, what’s the big idea?”
“Hmmm, who is this?”
“Aah, you don’t even have my number? I was in your team, remember?”
“Which company? Which team?”
[functional information being passed on]
“Oh! Yeah, now I remember! How are you doing?”
“I didn’t call you to tell me how I am doing! I just wanted to know why you Wow’ed my status update on my joining that hot start-up last year”
“Huh? I just noticed it randomly. I thought that was a good career move, so I Wow’ed it. What’s wrong?”
“I’ll tell you what’s wrong. That was an update from last year. Everybody has Liked it. You are the only one to Wow it, now. Frankly that looks like a sarcastic reaction!”
“Hey, I didn’t mean any sarcasm, I…”
“Yeah right, tell me about it! You [mild expletive]”
[steadily deteriorating conversation]

5. Phone conversation between mom and daughter

“Mom, what have you done?”
“Why, what happened?”
“Mom! You have Loved that post of mine where I mention that I had an accident!”
“Oh that, I was sending my love to you!”
“Did you see others’ reactions? They had Sadded it! You are the only one Love’ing it!”
“I can’t understand these things, I just sent my love to you!”
“Boohoohoo!”

6. Conversation between YouTube Dislike button and Facebook Reactions’ brand new Angry button

Dislike button of YouTube: “Phew… I finally have company in Facebook’s Angry. At last, there’s another button for expressing a negative sentiment!”
Facebook’s Angry icon: “Duh… I’m no way like you, dude!”
YouTube Dislike: “Haha… that’s what you think. Just wait for people to exploit and creatively expand your use-case!”
Facebook Angry: “Groan!”
YouTube Dislike: “Now that’s a button that your boss should have added!”

No, I’m not referring to emojis or emoticons that are already taking us back to Egyptian hieroglyphics.

I’m referring to the new ways to react, on Facebook. The Like now has 5 more for company.

These.

It’s early days to delve into the deeper implications for marketers and agencies with these new ways people can react to their posts. Facebook has started showing individual Reaction numbers on a per post basis in Facebook Insights, but there are no ways to look at Page-level numbers. Also, brands cannot yet use the new Reactions to target ads.

However, Facebook Reactions throws up a lot of intriguing issues that our society could do without. Here are some to begin with. Now, these may sound frivolous and funny, but I think they are imminent!

1. Scene in a corporate boardroom

Brand manager: “Boss, we did really well with our last campaign on Facebook! It got 789 Likes, 2,287 Yays and 324 Wows!”
Boss: “But why does it have 1,453 Sads and 954 Angrys? You mean we paid money to Facebook to promote our campaign and we got this in return?”

2. Phone conversation between 2 friends

Friend #1: “Dude, what the heck?”
Friend #2: “What happened man?”
F1: “You just Liked that pun of mine?”
F2: “Oh yeah, it was nice! You called me to just ask that?”
F1: “No. I called to ask why you didn’t Love it?”
F2: “Well, I did Like it, didn’t I? “
F1: “You see, F3 Loved it! So much for our friendship!”
F2: “But, but…”
F1: [Disconnects call]

3. Frenzied meeting at a superstar’s fan association

Head of Superstar actor’s rabid fans association: “Friends! We have an important assignment for tonight!”
Rabid fans: “Anything for our dear star!”
Head: “Remember… at 12am tonight, that other actor’s new film teaser is releasing! We have got to show our might!”
Rabid fans: “Just tell us what to do and we will all do it immediately!”
Head: “Go to the Facebook post announcing the new teaser and click on Angry… all of you!”
Rabid fans: “But, is that ‘angry about the content of the post’ or ‘angry at the person posting it’?”
Head: “Aah, that’s the beauty of Facebook! There are no such nuances on Facebook! Let us build a new meaning to the Angry button and use it to our advantage!”
Rabid fans: “Deal! Here we come Angry!!”

(Replace superstar’s fans with devotees of a Godman, or followers of a political party, and we have a fantastic new problem in our hands!)

4. Phone conversation between a person and his ex-boss!

Tring tring!
“Hello?”
“Hey, what’s the big idea?”
“Hmmm, who is this?”
“Aah, you don’t even have my number? I was in your team, remember?”
“Which company? Which team?”
[functional information being passed on]
“Oh! Yeah, now I remember! How are you doing?”
“I didn’t call you to tell me how I am doing! I just wanted to know why you Wow’ed my status update on my joining that hot start-up last year”
“Huh? I just noticed it randomly. I thought that was a good career move, so I Wow’ed it. What’s wrong?”
“I’ll tell you what’s wrong. That was an update from last year. Everybody has Liked it. You are the only one to Wow it, now. Frankly that looks like a sarcastic reaction!”
“Hey, I didn’t mean any sarcasm, I…”
“Yeah right, tell me about it! You [mild expletive]”
[steadily deteriorating conversation]

5. Phone conversation between mom and daughter

“Mom, what have you done?”
“Why, what happened?”
“Mom! You have Loved that post of mine where I mention that I had an accident!”
“Oh that, I was sending my love to you!”
“Did you see others’ reactions? They had Sadded it! You are the only one Love’ing it!”
“I can’t understand these things, I just sent my love to you!”
“Boohoohoo!”

6. Conversation between YouTube Dislike button and Facebook Reactions’ brand new Angry button

Dislike button of YouTube: “Phew… I finally have company in Facebook’s Angry. At last, there’s another button for expressing a negative sentiment!”
Facebook’s Angry icon: “Duh… I’m no way like you, dude!”
YouTube Dislike: “Haha… that’s what you think. Just wait for people to exploit and creatively expand your use-case!”
Facebook Angry: “Groan!”
YouTube Dislike: “Now that’s a button that your boss should have added!”

DAMN DANIEL!

If you don’t know what that greeting means then you missed the Internet this past week. Which means you may have also missed the Mobile World Congress and the 10,000th Republican Debate. But ALSO these things happened:

  • You can passive aggressively express emotions on Facebook now
  • If you were thinking if only this ad on Facebook would get bigger and take over my screen – dreams do come true
  • The best Snapchat tutorial comes from a 13 year old
  • LinkedIn turned it up with a new TV campaign at Sunday’s Academy Awards (GO LEO!)
  • Mexico is using Periscope in the most amazing way
  • Google is making your search a LOT faster

Have a wonderful week!

Twitter

Now You Can Create & Send Videos Privately Via DM

Shortly after enabling users to search for and send GIFs in tweets and direct messages, Twitter introduced the ability to capture and share videos in direct messages. The move brings Twitter closer to video-heavy messaging apps like Snapchat. >>Read More

Facebook

Facebook Officially Launches Canvas Ads That Load Full-Screen Rich Media Pages In-App

Facebook wants to give advertisers an immersive way to reach people without making them leave the social network. So, it introduced Canvas, a full-screen ad experience built for bringing brands and products to life on mobile. When users click a Facebook News Feed ad connected to Canvas, it opens a full-screen, rich media page inside of Facebook rather than forcing users to wait for a mobile website to load. Canvas removes constraints that low-power mobile sites put on content. Facebook Canvas allows interactive elements like animations, carousels, product catalogs, tilt-to-view images, and videos. Canvases appear linked to from News Feed ads on iOS and Android, and Facebook is evaluating how to expand this to other versions and apps such as Instagram.  Facebook for Business

And those emoticons finally launched. More here.

Snapchat

Snapchat Enlists Nielsen to Track Ad Campaigns

Specifically, Snapchat will be able to provide brands and agencies with Nielsen Digital Ad Ratings, which can track how many people a given ad campaign reaches. Meanwhile, Snapchat ad tech partners Innovid and Sizmek will each supply ad tags that allow more detailed tracking of how many times individual ads are delivered in campaigns. (source: WSJ)  

Also the funniest thing we read all week about Snapchat courtesy of Elsbitch and Bitchamen Hoeson. Seriously read this or risk being a NARP.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn Debuted Its First TV Commercial During the Oscars

The 30-second spot debuted during the Academy Awards telecast on Sunday. It’s an inspirational ad bouncing off a finding by NASA that 3 million LinkedIn users qualify to be astronauts. BBDO San Francisco handled the creative for the ad, which is expected to air also during “Shark Tank” and “Fresh Off The Boat.” (Ad Age)

BuzzFeed

BuzzFeed Creates Its First All-Video App 

BuzzFeed launched a new mobile app, BuzzFeed Video, so viewers can watch all their videos in one place. Until now, this content has been exclusive to Facebook and YouTube. There are two sections to the app, one for individual trending videos and the other for shows you are subscribing to. BuzzFeed also plans to use their own native player in order to collect more data about user activity and more flexibility to deliver a customized user experience.

Pinterest 

Pinterest Launches Updates To Rich Pins With Recipes And Movie Data

In order to enhance the user experience, Pinterest has launched updates to its movie and recipe Rich Pins to continue gathering helpful data within each pin. A Rich Pin is a pin that includes extra information right on the Pin itself. The movie pins will add information such as: rating, cast members, and [http://Must-watch Movies]movie reviews. Because 90% of Pinners are saving food and drink recipes, these pins will be enhanced with cooking times, serving sizes, and ingredients.

Only 17% of the Fortune 500 Are Active on Pinterest 

Although many Fortune 500 companies are active on Facebook and Twitter, why do so many forgo Pinterest? (Study)

Tumblr

Tumblr Has a New CTO: Brian Murphy From the New York Times

Tumblr has hired Brian Murphy, former VP of engineering at the New York Times, as the company’s new chief technology officer. Read More

YouTube

YouTube is Launching a New Tool That Lets Filmmakers Blur Out Any Object

YouTube is launching a custom blurring tool today that will let filmmakers blur out any object in their videos. Read More

Periscope

Mexico City Officials Are Shaming Litterbugs and Parking Hogs on Periscope, and People Love It

Mexico City police have failed to keep the capital’s unruly residents from invading streets and sidewalks with their illegally parked cars, security details, and trash. So officials are resorting to the shaming power of social media. Read More

Google+ (Well, Google)

Google Joins Race to Speed Up Mobile Delivery of News Articles

When you conduct a Google search on your smartphone for a newsy topic — say, “Donald Trump” — the results starting on Wednesday will include a horizontal carousel of news articles, each with a little lightning bolt icon and the letters AMP at the bottom. Click on any one of the articles, and it will come up immediately, with no wait. The fast-loading format is the latest effort by online publications to solve a problem that is the bane of smartphone users everywhere: Most mobile web pages take too long to load.

AMP achieves its remarkable speeds in two ways. First, it requires web developers to use a narrow set of web technologies to create pages. Second, it serves pages from its own servers, at least when you visit an AMP page via a Google search. Sites that follow these specifications to the letter will receive special treatment from Google.  That sounds great for publishers who have decided to build AMP sites, but there’s a catch: if readers decide to share a link to an AMP page they’ve clicked on through a Google search, the link points to Google.com (for example, google.com/amp/yoursite.com/yourpage/amp), not to your site. With its AMP search results, Google is amassing content on its own servers and keeping readers on Google. (Source: New York Times and Wired)

Also: Why Google AMP Is So Much Faster in Three Dramatic Charts

Compiled by our West Region strategists including Melanie TaylorCameron JoyeLaura GrahamKate Acker, Austin DeArmanPam Franklinand Lauren Wesche.

DAMN DANIEL!

If you don’t know what that greeting means then you missed the Internet this past week. Which means you may have also missed the Mobile World Congress and the 10,000th Republican Debate. But ALSO these things happened:

  • You can passive aggressively express emotions on Facebook now
  • If you were thinking if only this ad on Facebook would get bigger and take over my screen – dreams do come true
  • The best Snapchat tutorial comes from a 13 year old
  • LinkedIn turned it up with a new TV campaign at Sunday’s Academy Awards (GO LEO!)
  • Mexico is using Periscope in the most amazing way
  • Google is making your search a LOT faster

Have a wonderful week!

Twitter

Now You Can Create & Send Videos Privately Via DM

Shortly after enabling users to search for and send GIFs in tweets and direct messages, Twitter introduced the ability to capture and share videos in direct messages. The move brings Twitter closer to video-heavy messaging apps like Snapchat. >>Read More

Facebook

Facebook Officially Launches Canvas Ads That Load Full-Screen Rich Media Pages In-App

Facebook wants to give advertisers an immersive way to reach people without making them leave the social network. So, it introduced Canvas, a full-screen ad experience built for bringing brands and products to life on mobile. When users click a Facebook News Feed ad connected to Canvas, it opens a full-screen, rich media page inside of Facebook rather than forcing users to wait for a mobile website to load. Canvas removes constraints that low-power mobile sites put on content. Facebook Canvas allows interactive elements like animations, carousels, product catalogs, tilt-to-view images, and videos. Canvases appear linked to from News Feed ads on iOS and Android, and Facebook is evaluating how to expand this to other versions and apps such as Instagram.  Facebook for Business

And those emoticons finally launched. More here.

Snapchat

Snapchat Enlists Nielsen to Track Ad Campaigns

Specifically, Snapchat will be able to provide brands and agencies with Nielsen Digital Ad Ratings, which can track how many people a given ad campaign reaches. Meanwhile, Snapchat ad tech partners Innovid and Sizmek will each supply ad tags that allow more detailed tracking of how many times individual ads are delivered in campaigns. (source: WSJ)  

Also the funniest thing we read all week about Snapchat courtesy of Elsbitch and Bitchamen Hoeson. Seriously read this or risk being a NARP.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn Debuted Its First TV Commercial During the Oscars

The 30-second spot debuted during the Academy Awards telecast on Sunday. It’s an inspirational ad bouncing off a finding by NASA that 3 million LinkedIn users qualify to be astronauts. BBDO San Francisco handled the creative for the ad, which is expected to air also during “Shark Tank” and “Fresh Off The Boat.” (Ad Age)

BuzzFeed

BuzzFeed Creates Its First All-Video App 

BuzzFeed launched a new mobile app, BuzzFeed Video, so viewers can watch all their videos in one place. Until now, this content has been exclusive to Facebook and YouTube. There are two sections to the app, one for individual trending videos and the other for shows you are subscribing to. BuzzFeed also plans to use their own native player in order to collect more data about user activity and more flexibility to deliver a customized user experience.

Pinterest 

Pinterest Launches Updates To Rich Pins With Recipes And Movie Data

In order to enhance the user experience, Pinterest has launched updates to its movie and recipe Rich Pins to continue gathering helpful data within each pin. A Rich Pin is a pin that includes extra information right on the Pin itself. The movie pins will add information such as: rating, cast members, and [http://Must-watch Movies]movie reviews. Because 90% of Pinners are saving food and drink recipes, these pins will be enhanced with cooking times, serving sizes, and ingredients.

Only 17% of the Fortune 500 Are Active on Pinterest 

Although many Fortune 500 companies are active on Facebook and Twitter, why do so many forgo Pinterest? (Study)

Tumblr

Tumblr Has a New CTO: Brian Murphy From the New York Times

Tumblr has hired Brian Murphy, former VP of engineering at the New York Times, as the company’s new chief technology officer. Read More

YouTube

YouTube is Launching a New Tool That Lets Filmmakers Blur Out Any Object

YouTube is launching a custom blurring tool today that will let filmmakers blur out any object in their videos. Read More

Periscope

Mexico City Officials Are Shaming Litterbugs and Parking Hogs on Periscope, and People Love It

Mexico City police have failed to keep the capital’s unruly residents from invading streets and sidewalks with their illegally parked cars, security details, and trash. So officials are resorting to the shaming power of social media. Read More

Google+ (Well, Google)

Google Joins Race to Speed Up Mobile Delivery of News Articles

When you conduct a Google search on your smartphone for a newsy topic — say, “Donald Trump” — the results starting on Wednesday will include a horizontal carousel of news articles, each with a little lightning bolt icon and the letters AMP at the bottom. Click on any one of the articles, and it will come up immediately, with no wait. The fast-loading format is the latest effort by online publications to solve a problem that is the bane of smartphone users everywhere: Most mobile web pages take too long to load.

AMP achieves its remarkable speeds in two ways. First, it requires web developers to use a narrow set of web technologies to create pages. Second, it serves pages from its own servers, at least when you visit an AMP page via a Google search. Sites that follow these specifications to the letter will receive special treatment from Google.  That sounds great for publishers who have decided to build AMP sites, but there’s a catch: if readers decide to share a link to an AMP page they’ve clicked on through a Google search, the link points to Google.com (for example, google.com/amp/yoursite.com/yourpage/amp), not to your site. With its AMP search results, Google is amassing content on its own servers and keeping readers on Google. (Source: New York Times and Wired)

Also: Why Google AMP Is So Much Faster in Three Dramatic Charts

Compiled by our West Region strategists including Melanie TaylorCameron JoyeLaura GrahamKate Acker, Austin DeArmanPam Franklinand Lauren Wesche.

Life is more complex than a simple “like.” For this reason, Facebook launched five new emojistyle reactions this week. And no, “dislike” is not one of them.

The new emoji Reactions include: angry, sad, wow, haha and love. “Yay” was reported to be a proposed reaction; however, this sentiment is not universally understood.

Learn more about Reactions, why the change, and the implications for brands below:

Life is more complex than a simple “like.” For this reason, Facebook launched five new emojistyle reactions this week. And no, “dislike” is not one of them.

The new emoji Reactions include: angry, sad, wow, haha and love. “Yay” was reported to be a proposed reaction; however, this sentiment is not universally understood.

Learn more about Reactions, why the change, and the implications for brands below:

The term ‘Millennial’ is “nothing more than a convenient idea, a series of uninteresting generalizations existing solely in the heads of media pundits and marketers.” (States of the American Millennial)

This teen-to-early-thirty something generation is actually a series of subgroups divided by age and socioeconomic situation. From the prosperous to the resource-barren, and from those who witnessed Steve Jobs’ liminal iPhone keynote speech to those who now watch it on YouTube as a historical text.

States of the American Millennial, a part of the OgilvyRED Think Series, takes a detailed look at this so-called ‘Millennial generation,’ breaking down the subgroups, their lifestyles, interests, ambitions, and much more.

To learn more about the paper below or get a hard copy, please contact Peter Fasano, Global Consulting Principal of Digital Strategy at OgilvyRED.

The term ‘Millennial’ is “nothing more than a convenient idea, a series of uninteresting generalizations existing solely in the heads of media pundits and marketers.” (States of the American Millennial)

This teen-to-early-thirty something generation is actually a series of subgroups divided by age and socioeconomic situation. From the prosperous to the resource-barren, and from those who witnessed Steve Jobs’ liminal iPhone keynote speech to those who now watch it on YouTube as a historical text.

States of the American Millennial, a part of the OgilvyRED Think Series, takes a detailed look at this so-called ‘Millennial generation,’ breaking down the subgroups, their lifestyles, interests, ambitions, and much more.

To learn more about the paper below or get a hard copy, please contact Peter Fasano, Global Consulting Principal of Digital Strategy at OgilvyRED.

“The rules of engagement are still being reset. How will you engage?”

Our second panel at the Social That Sells event for Social Media Week NYC focused on the evolving creator landscape and how brands can engage. Rob Davis, from OgilvyOne NYC, kicked off the session explaining how society is still coming to grips with the digital revolution… but not everyone is sitting around waiting.

There are new rules of digital engagement. Created by creators. And thankfully we have an inside view!

The rules:

  1. Pure passion trumps production. Every single creator said you have to be passionate, or else. It has become more meaningful than the types of content because the online ‘party’ is the connection, not the production.
  2. Community is King. 20% of superfans drive 80% of engagement and traffic for successful creators.
  3. Be engagement driven, not hit driven. Creators and community members live by the same rules and are participatory. They collaborate and the level of engagement further empowers the creators.
  4. Think small to be big. None of the successful creators Rob Davis surveyed said they wanted to be “big”; instead they set out to create content they are passionate about, and inadvertently became famous by serving a segment.
  5. Make universes, not content. Focus on creating a brand experience rather than tailoring content to each social media channel. This will streamline production and ease platform navigation.
  6. Revenue grows when it disappears. Creators welcome the right brand messages but are willing to turn away the ‘wrong’ brands if it risks authenticity. The creators keep the community at the heart of the business and put brands second. Let go of interruption so it includes the audience via the creator’s voice.

digital social contract

Read the full paper, The Digital Social Contract. 

Next Rob Davis was joined by Ana Kasparian, John Iadarola and Chris Puckett, all from The Young Turks Network, who shared thoughts on how their new style of content has created super fans:

  • The relationship with their audience is built on truth and storytelling. Ana Kasparian said, “Our number one priority is truth telling” and she explained how The Young Turks never have teleprompters because they want to have a conversation with their audience.
  • The Young Turks have ‘super fans’. Some helped fund the building of a new studio via an Indie GoGo fundraising initiative whilst other avid fans are willing to pay a premium for the content. Furthermore, John Iadarola, co-host of the show, was originally a ‘superfan’. He was discovered as an (unpaid) content contributor before being brought on as an official employee.
  • The advertising needs to be entertaining and interesting to the audience. The hosts and production team asked themselves, “how can the advertising not disrupt so much?” The advertising is content-first, rather than brand message first so that it adds to the culture of the show and creates a seamless user experience.
  • The Young Turks have turned down potential sponsors (e.g. for-profit colleges) because they weren’t a good fit for the show. Ana Kasparian explained, “There are certain things [sponsors] that we just don’t touch. You have to do a cost-benefit analysis and see if an opportunity is worth it.”
  • The Young Turks started out on satellite radio and confessed “it was a little scary” when they made the switch to digital-only. YouTube saved the organization with advertising options, combined with The Young Turks ongoing membership database.

How will you adapt to the new rules of digital engagement? Let us know in the comments below.

“The rules of engagement are still being reset. How will you engage?”

Our second panel at the Social That Sells event for Social Media Week NYC focused on the evolving creator landscape and how brands can engage. Rob Davis, from OgilvyOne NYC, kicked off the session explaining how society is still coming to grips with the digital revolution… but not everyone is sitting around waiting.

There are new rules of digital engagement. Created by creators. And thankfully we have an inside view!

The rules:

  1. Pure passion trumps production. Every single creator said you have to be passionate, or else. It has become more meaningful than the types of content because the online ‘party’ is the connection, not the production.
  2. Community is King. 20% of superfans drive 80% of engagement and traffic for successful creators.
  3. Be engagement driven, not hit driven. Creators and community members live by the same rules and are participatory. They collaborate and the level of engagement further empowers the creators.
  4. Think small to be big. None of the successful creators Rob Davis surveyed said they wanted to be “big”; instead they set out to create content they are passionate about, and inadvertently became famous by serving a segment.
  5. Make universes, not content. Focus on creating a brand experience rather than tailoring content to each social media channel. This will streamline production and ease platform navigation.
  6. Revenue grows when it disappears. Creators welcome the right brand messages but are willing to turn away the ‘wrong’ brands if it risks authenticity. The creators keep the community at the heart of the business and put brands second. Let go of interruption so it includes the audience via the creator’s voice.

digital social contract

Read the full paper, The Digital Social Contract. 

Next Rob Davis was joined by Ana Kasparian, John Iadarola and Chris Puckett, all from The Young Turks Network, who shared thoughts on how their new style of content has created super fans:

  • The relationship with their audience is built on truth and storytelling. Ana Kasparian said, “Our number one priority is truth telling” and she explained how The Young Turks never have teleprompters because they want to have a conversation with their audience.
  • The Young Turks have ‘super fans’. Some helped fund the building of a new studio via an Indie GoGo fundraising initiative whilst other avid fans are willing to pay a premium for the content. Furthermore, John Iadarola, co-host of the show, was originally a ‘superfan’. He was discovered as an (unpaid) content contributor before being brought on as an official employee.
  • The advertising needs to be entertaining and interesting to the audience. The hosts and production team asked themselves, “how can the advertising not disrupt so much?” The advertising is content-first, rather than brand message first so that it adds to the culture of the show and creates a seamless user experience.
  • The Young Turks have turned down potential sponsors (e.g. for-profit colleges) because they weren’t a good fit for the show. Ana Kasparian explained, “There are certain things [sponsors] that we just don’t touch. You have to do a cost-benefit analysis and see if an opportunity is worth it.”
  • The Young Turks started out on satellite radio and confessed “it was a little scary” when they made the switch to digital-only. YouTube saved the organization with advertising options, combined with The Young Turks ongoing membership database.

How will you adapt to the new rules of digital engagement? Let us know in the comments below.