The Only Influence Marketing Workbook You'll Ever Need

Influence marketing keeps evolving at a rapid pace. That’s why I created this workbook based on my own influence marketing planning process.

Use this workbook to identify the right influencers for your next project. You can also use it as a template for any presentations you need to do for teams or clients. The workbook comes in PowerPoint format and is fully customizable, so that when you fill in the information about your influence marketing strategy, you get all the credit!

This workbook will help you identify and power:

  • Who are your influencer personas?
  • How to build an ongoing influence marketing strategy.
  • Which metrics to track and measure to calculate success.
  • Plan for an entire year of influencer-powered marketing.

Download the workbook for free, and go get your planning started!

GroupHigh Workbook

Get more content like this, plus the very BEST marketing education, totally free. Get our Definitive email newsletter.

       

The Only Influence Marketing Workbook You'll Ever Need

Influence marketing keeps evolving at a rapid pace. That’s why I created this workbook based on my own influence marketing planning process.

Use this workbook to identify the right influencers for your next project. You can also use it as a template for any presentations you need to do for teams or clients. The workbook comes in PowerPoint format and is fully customizable, so that when you fill in the information about your influence marketing strategy, you get all the credit!

This workbook will help you identify and power:

  • Who are your influencer personas?
  • How to build an ongoing influence marketing strategy.
  • Which metrics to track and measure to calculate success.
  • Plan for an entire year of influencer-powered marketing.

Download the workbook for free, and go get your planning started!

GroupHigh Workbook

Get more content like this, plus the very BEST marketing education, totally free. Get our Definitive email newsletter.

       

Allie Ingalls - InstagramA Little Sunshine Goes a Long Way

Are influence and advocacy marketing the gifts that keep on giving?

Yes, yes they are. And knowing how to tap into pre-existing fans and authentic emotional stories gives you even more. Allie Ingalls and Jennie Hughes of WhiteWave Foods agree that being generous with customer rewards and aware of consumer needs help create a lasting and effective base for true advocacy and successful influence marketing campaigns.

WhiteWave Foods is a big company on a big scale, and—most importantly—has a big heart and a small family farm feel. Dedicated to creating, promoting, and distributing healthy foods worldwide, WhiteWave actively creates innovative products and marketing to drive the demand for healthier foods everywhere. Allie and Jennie are experts on how to make a big idea feel personal, approachable, and successful. (highlight to tweet) They’ve gathered many rays of insights and tools, and, thankfully for us, are willing to share their sunshine.

In This Episode

  • How telling a story is good advertising
  • Why giving gifts to customers will bring high returns
  • Why it helps to use fans as influence marketers
  • Why constant innovation is essential in marketing
  • How influence and advocacy are connected

 

Quotes From This Episode

“An influencer can really be anyone from day to day. (highlight to tweet) And it’s really someone who’s passionate about a belief or opinion or product and they feel so passionate about it that they really want to share that with others.” —@Jennie0384

“It kind of makes you think about the ripple effect. We sort of hit the bullseye and then let the bullseye sort of extend beyond and beyond. I love the idea of giving legs to someone who’s going to advocate for us on our behalf and empowering them to send the message further.” —@allieingalls

“I think the most important things is we’re finding influencers who are already fans of our brand. It’s so much easier to be able to activate your brand message and your brand promise with people who are already excited to tell your story and they’re already natural advocates.” —@Jennie0384

“You need to do something innovative and unique to break through the noise a little bit.” —@allieingalls

“I always say don’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Allow your influencers to shine through and find their strength and activate them according to the platforms you have.” —@allieingalls (highlight to tweet)

“I think that paid sponsorships aren’t necessarily a bad thing, but the way you do it is so critical. (highlight to tweet) Just making sure that you’re coming across is very authentic. So when we brief our influencers, we’re very, very careful to just setup some guardrails and let them fill in and take the message that we’re trying to promote and make it their own. Otherwise their followers are going to know that’s not real. That’s not a very genuine endorsement.” —@Jennie0384

“It’s really more on brands to ensure that as we’re working with influencers, we’re doing it in a very meaningful and relevant way. (highlight to tweet) I think those kinds of messages, is what really breaks through the clutter and the noise of digital.” —@Jennie0384

Resources

 

Would You Rather

Allie Ingalls

Would you rather, for a whole year, live in a tent in the woods or have your own bunk at a hostel?

Okay, listen, hostel all the way. That has electricity and running water. No, I don’t camp.

Would you rather be CEO of a Fortune 500 or just a really popular seller on Etsy?

I would rather be CEO of a Fortune 500 company. I do not know how to make things.

Jennie Hughes

Would rather get $10 million or never look older than 25?

I would probably rather get $10 million. I think I have a lot of things that I would like to do with that. I actually don’t mind aging. I think it’s somewhat of a mark of your experience, so to speak. So that one I’m okay with. But I think the money would definitely help. I’ve got a 12-year-old daughter who’s probably going to want to go to college, I would imagine.

Would you rather be unable to make phone calls for a year or totally unable to receive emails for a year?

That one is super easy. I would much rather not receive emails for a year. That sounds like a vacation.

       

Allie Ingalls - InstagramA Little Sunshine Goes a Long Way

Are influence and advocacy marketing the gifts that keep on giving?

Yes, yes they are. And knowing how to tap into pre-existing fans and authentic emotional stories gives you even more. Allie Ingalls and Jennie Hughes of WhiteWave Foods agree that being generous with customer rewards and aware of consumer needs help create a lasting and effective base for true advocacy and successful influence marketing campaigns.

WhiteWave Foods is a big company on a big scale, and—most importantly—has a big heart and a small family farm feel. Dedicated to creating, promoting, and distributing healthy foods worldwide, WhiteWave actively creates innovative products and marketing to drive the demand for healthier foods everywhere. Allie and Jennie are experts on how to make a big idea feel personal, approachable, and successful. (highlight to tweet) They’ve gathered many rays of insights and tools, and, thankfully for us, are willing to share their sunshine.

In This Episode

  • How telling a story is good advertising
  • Why giving gifts to customers will bring high returns
  • Why it helps to use fans as influence marketers
  • Why constant innovation is essential in marketing
  • How influence and advocacy are connected

 

Quotes From This Episode

“An influencer can really be anyone from day to day. (highlight to tweet) And it’s really someone who’s passionate about a belief or opinion or product and they feel so passionate about it that they really want to share that with others.” —@Jennie0384

“It kind of makes you think about the ripple effect. We sort of hit the bullseye and then let the bullseye sort of extend beyond and beyond. I love the idea of giving legs to someone who’s going to advocate for us on our behalf and empowering them to send the message further.” —@allieingalls

“I think the most important things is we’re finding influencers who are already fans of our brand. It’s so much easier to be able to activate your brand message and your brand promise with people who are already excited to tell your story and they’re already natural advocates.” —@Jennie0384

“You need to do something innovative and unique to break through the noise a little bit.” —@allieingalls

“I always say don’t fit a square peg into a round hole. Allow your influencers to shine through and find their strength and activate them according to the platforms you have.” —@allieingalls (highlight to tweet)

“I think that paid sponsorships aren’t necessarily a bad thing, but the way you do it is so critical. (highlight to tweet) Just making sure that you’re coming across is very authentic. So when we brief our influencers, we’re very, very careful to just setup some guardrails and let them fill in and take the message that we’re trying to promote and make it their own. Otherwise their followers are going to know that’s not real. That’s not a very genuine endorsement.” —@Jennie0384

“It’s really more on brands to ensure that as we’re working with influencers, we’re doing it in a very meaningful and relevant way. (highlight to tweet) I think those kinds of messages, is what really breaks through the clutter and the noise of digital.” —@Jennie0384

Resources

 

Would You Rather

Allie Ingalls

Would you rather, for a whole year, live in a tent in the woods or have your own bunk at a hostel?

Okay, listen, hostel all the way. That has electricity and running water. No, I don’t camp.

Would you rather be CEO of a Fortune 500 or just a really popular seller on Etsy?

I would rather be CEO of a Fortune 500 company. I do not know how to make things.

Jennie Hughes

Would rather get $10 million or never look older than 25?

I would probably rather get $10 million. I think I have a lot of things that I would like to do with that. I actually don’t mind aging. I think it’s somewhat of a mark of your experience, so to speak. So that one I’m okay with. But I think the money would definitely help. I’ve got a 12-year-old daughter who’s probably going to want to go to college, I would imagine.

Would you rather be unable to make phone calls for a year or totally unable to receive emails for a year?

That one is super easy. I would much rather not receive emails for a year. That sounds like a vacation.

       

extreme-content-focus-cover

If you’ve been reading my latest posts here at Content Marketing Institute, you’ll see a trend around differentiation. Specifically, either start telling a different story or don’t bother at all.

Related to this, Gary Vaynerchuk made a statement in the first minute of his DailyVee 015 show that’s worth breaking apart:

The No. 1 thing that you can do is … you need to decide what’s the one thing that you are better at than anything else … and you need to become the extreme version of that.


What’s the 1 thing that you are better at than anything else? Become the extreme version of that via @garyvee
Click To Tweet


Generalist content doesn’t cut through the clutter, and yet most of the content marketing examples we see are just that – general. Worse yet, they are general and not helpful. In that case, it would be better not to create any content at all.

Easier said than done

While as a content marketer you may believe that is true, choosing a content area is anything but simple. Just look at any decent-sized enterprise. Each product manager wants a focus on the problems around his or her product. The content person rises to the challenge by creating content around multiple themes and campaigns. The content person is charged with creating content for more product managers.

Wonderful, now all the product areas have some “content.” But what happens? We can’t possibly deliver the best content in the world if we are filling content holes in every part of the enterprise. This is like working in your email inbox the entire day. By the end of the day, you realize how unproductive you’ve been.

You must choose. Go back up to Gary’s quote and look at the word “decide.” You must choose. It doesn’t just happen. As Michael Porter so eloquently says, “Strategy is choice. Strategy means saying no to certain kinds of things.”


Strategy is choice. Strategy means saying no to certain kinds of things says @MichaelEPorter via @cmicontent
Click To Tweet


You have to make the hard choice. You need to make a decision on where to put your eggs. Where can you make meaningful impact?

Finding extreme – knowledge and skill

In my latest book Content Inc. I talk about the importance of identifying your sweet spot. For a larger enterprise, the sweet spot is the intersection of an exceptional knowledge or unique skill area and a defined customer pain point.

Knowledge-customer-pain-points

What do we mean by knowledge? Knowledge is information acquired about a particular subject through study or observation.

Joseph Kalinowski, our creative director at Content Marketing Institute, has knowledge (by the definition above) in a number of areas including the band Kiss, the Pittsburgh Steelers, Star Wars action figures, and Jack Daniels. For any one of these topics, Joseph would destroy the average person with his knowledge in that area.

In addition to his knowledge areas, Joseph is also a skilled graphic designer. Skill is defined by dictionary.com as “the ability to do something well” or an area in which a person has “expertise or competence.” Simply put, skill is knowledge used properly.

If Joseph wanted to start an audience-building content marketing strategy, he would start by listing these areas (even before looking at the target audience’s needs). It’s better to look at your own strengths first – where you have a unique story to tell – instead of identifying the customer pain points and then seeing if you have anything to offer.

Long story short – you have to find your extreme area of possible authority.

Where to start – an exercise

Begin by listing those areas in which your organization has a skill set or knowledge area in something that’s larger or better than the average organization. This is brainstorming time – more is better at this point.

Knowledge areas                                                            

1.

2.

3.

4.

Special skills

1.

2.

3.

4.

If you completed the exercise correctly, you should have significantly more knowledge areas than skill areas. Here’s how this exercise might look for agricultural equipment manufacturer John Deere.

Knowledge areas

  • Agricultural technology
  • How to profit as a farmer
  • Supply chain/logistics in agriculture
  • Energy costs and farming
  • How a small business farmer can grow new revenue streams

Special skills

  • Manufacturing farming equipment
  • Design simulation specific to agriculture
  • International trade relations

After you’ve completed this little exercise, rate your knowledge areas and special skills with your team. Put a 5 next to the ones where you are “off the charts” with your skill or expertise. Put a 1 next to those that really don’t differentiate your organization from any other.

Identify customer pain point

Great. You now have lots of knowledge and skill areas. I hope you identified a few you never thought of. Now, you need to find the customer pain point to finish determining the sweet spot.

First, you have to identify the customer.

For this to work, the focus needs to be on one audience persona. If you are a business-to-business marketer, you may have seven to nine decision-maker, influencer, and gatekeeper audiences that you are targeting with your communications or which are part of the buying process. Again, you need to choose.

In this stage, most marketers don’t want to choose. They believe if they choose, someone will be left out (either an audience member or a product manager who needs content). But if you don’t choose, your content never becomes specific or relevant enough to matter … to get attention … to build trust.

Altair Engineering, a B2B simulation-software company, created a content brand called Enlighten, specifically designed for mechanical engineers who use simulation software. Once Altair chose the audience, it identified a key problem – product weight reduction.

In manufacturing, the weight of a product is critical to its production costs, its shipping cost, and the possibility that the product will be specified into a larger product set. In other words, weight matters to mechanical engineers.

Altair chose to become the problem-solver around product weight reduction, and includes this mission statement on the site:

The enlighten website has been created by Altair ProductDesign and strives to be the world’s leading source for useful, informative and inspirational content concerned with minimizing the weight of products across industry. Enlighten is intended to help inform and educate on the current thinking and trends in the market and highlight advances in lightweight design techniques, materials technology and manufacturing processes.

Not bad, right?

Choosing the pain

Again, get back with your team and do the exercise … list critical pain points that your audience has. You already know many of them because you’ve been marketing to them, but now is the time to talk to your salespeople, your customer service folks, your engineers, and product people.

Once your list is complete, rate each from 1 (snoozer) to 5 (critical problem that affects the livelihood of the audience).

You have to choose. This is what Zig Ziglar calls being “meaningful specific.” If you are “meaningful broad,” you’ll never be relevant enough. You have to decide on the customer pain point where you can help and make a real impact on your customer (or future customer).


Don’t become a wandering generality. Be a meaningful specific says @TheZigZiglar via @cmicontent
Click To Tweet


How do you know?

If you are struggling to know whether you are specific enough, just ask yourself the following question, “If we delivered compelling and relevant content on a consistent basis to our target audience around this topic over a long period, could we become the leading informational providers in the world around that topic?”

If the answer is no, you are not specific enough. Period.

Connecting to create your sweet spot

Now, match the areas which have a 5 – from your knowledge and skill side – with the customer pain points that have a 5. After going through this exercise, you’ll uncover a few areas that you can seriously run with. You’ll also probably discover that what you had been creating content around is not even close to being “meaningful specific.”

Understanding the model

Why is this model important? Your business might have a knowledge area that may not be relevant to customers. For example, a number of General Electric executives are knowledgeable in business strategy. GE’s internal training programs are some of the most famous ever developed by a corporation. That said, that knowledge may not translate into solving a GE customer’s issue or pain point. So GE’s knowledge of business strategy doesn’t necessarily align with the targeted customer’s pain point and doesn’t work for the sweet spot model.

Doug Kessler, co-founder of content agency Velocity Partners, believes the sweet spot is three-dimensional. It’s important to know the exact size, shape, and depth. As he details:

  • Size – Your sweet spot should be a focused area, with as tight a focus as possible without leaving stuff out.
  • Shape – You need to know exactly where your expertise reaches and where it stops. Just because you have knowledge in certain areas doesn’t mean that authority naturally extends to other areas.
  • Depth – Your expertise goes as deeply as it needs to go; you don’t have to pretend it goes deeper.

Going the distance

Whether you are just starting out with a content marketing strategy for a new audience or retrofitting an old strategy with new thinking, I believe this exercise is worth doing. As my partner-in-crime Robert Rose says at the end of every This Old Marketing podcast, “It’s your story to tell … tell it well.” Find a story that’s worth telling … your unique story that is meaningful to a particular audience. Be extreme!

For regular insight, practical advice, and helpful exercises from Joe Pulizzi and other experts in content marketing, subscribe to the free daily or weekly CMI blog.

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute

The post Finding Your Sweet Spot – An Extreme Content Focus [Exercise] appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

extreme-content-focus-cover

If you’ve been reading my latest posts here at Content Marketing Institute, you’ll see a trend around differentiation. Specifically, either start telling a different story or don’t bother at all.

Related to this, Gary Vaynerchuk made a statement in the first minute of his DailyVee 015 show that’s worth breaking apart:

The No. 1 thing that you can do is … you need to decide what’s the one thing that you are better at than anything else … and you need to become the extreme version of that.


What’s the 1 thing that you are better at than anything else? Become the extreme version of that via @garyvee
Click To Tweet


Generalist content doesn’t cut through the clutter, and yet most of the content marketing examples we see are just that – general. Worse yet, they are general and not helpful. In that case, it would be better not to create any content at all.

Easier said than done

While as a content marketer you may believe that is true, choosing a content area is anything but simple. Just look at any decent-sized enterprise. Each product manager wants a focus on the problems around his or her product. The content person rises to the challenge by creating content around multiple themes and campaigns. The content person is charged with creating content for more product managers.

Wonderful, now all the product areas have some “content.” But what happens? We can’t possibly deliver the best content in the world if we are filling content holes in every part of the enterprise. This is like working in your email inbox the entire day. By the end of the day, you realize how unproductive you’ve been.

You must choose. Go back up to Gary’s quote and look at the word “decide.” You must choose. It doesn’t just happen. As Michael Porter so eloquently says, “Strategy is choice. Strategy means saying no to certain kinds of things.”


Strategy is choice. Strategy means saying no to certain kinds of things says @MichaelEPorter via @cmicontent
Click To Tweet


You have to make the hard choice. You need to make a decision on where to put your eggs. Where can you make meaningful impact?

Finding extreme – knowledge and skill

In my latest book Content Inc. I talk about the importance of identifying your sweet spot. For a larger enterprise, the sweet spot is the intersection of an exceptional knowledge or unique skill area and a defined customer pain point.

Knowledge-customer-pain-points

What do we mean by knowledge? Knowledge is information acquired about a particular subject through study or observation.

Joseph Kalinowski, our creative director at Content Marketing Institute, has knowledge (by the definition above) in a number of areas including the band Kiss, the Pittsburgh Steelers, Star Wars action figures, and Jack Daniels. For any one of these topics, Joseph would destroy the average person with his knowledge in that area.

In addition to his knowledge areas, Joseph is also a skilled graphic designer. Skill is defined by dictionary.com as “the ability to do something well” or an area in which a person has “expertise or competence.” Simply put, skill is knowledge used properly.

If Joseph wanted to start an audience-building content marketing strategy, he would start by listing these areas (even before looking at the target audience’s needs). It’s better to look at your own strengths first – where you have a unique story to tell – instead of identifying the customer pain points and then seeing if you have anything to offer.

Long story short – you have to find your extreme area of possible authority.

Where to start – an exercise

Begin by listing those areas in which your organization has a skill set or knowledge area in something that’s larger or better than the average organization. This is brainstorming time – more is better at this point.

Knowledge areas                                                            

1.

2.

3.

4.

Special skills

1.

2.

3.

4.

If you completed the exercise correctly, you should have significantly more knowledge areas than skill areas. Here’s how this exercise might look for agricultural equipment manufacturer John Deere.

Knowledge areas

  • Agricultural technology
  • How to profit as a farmer
  • Supply chain/logistics in agriculture
  • Energy costs and farming
  • How a small business farmer can grow new revenue streams

Special skills

  • Manufacturing farming equipment
  • Design simulation specific to agriculture
  • International trade relations

After you’ve completed this little exercise, rate your knowledge areas and special skills with your team. Put a 5 next to the ones where you are “off the charts” with your skill or expertise. Put a 1 next to those that really don’t differentiate your organization from any other.

Identify customer pain point

Great. You now have lots of knowledge and skill areas. I hope you identified a few you never thought of. Now, you need to find the customer pain point to finish determining the sweet spot.

First, you have to identify the customer.

For this to work, the focus needs to be on one audience persona. If you are a business-to-business marketer, you may have seven to nine decision-maker, influencer, and gatekeeper audiences that you are targeting with your communications or which are part of the buying process. Again, you need to choose.

In this stage, most marketers don’t want to choose. They believe if they choose, someone will be left out (either an audience member or a product manager who needs content). But if you don’t choose, your content never becomes specific or relevant enough to matter … to get attention … to build trust.

Altair Engineering, a B2B simulation-software company, created a content brand called Enlighten, specifically designed for mechanical engineers who use simulation software. Once Altair chose the audience, it identified a key problem – product weight reduction.

In manufacturing, the weight of a product is critical to its production costs, its shipping cost, and the possibility that the product will be specified into a larger product set. In other words, weight matters to mechanical engineers.

Altair chose to become the problem-solver around product weight reduction, and includes this mission statement on the site:

The enlighten website has been created by Altair ProductDesign and strives to be the world’s leading source for useful, informative and inspirational content concerned with minimizing the weight of products across industry. Enlighten is intended to help inform and educate on the current thinking and trends in the market and highlight advances in lightweight design techniques, materials technology and manufacturing processes.

Not bad, right?

Choosing the pain

Again, get back with your team and do the exercise … list critical pain points that your audience has. You already know many of them because you’ve been marketing to them, but now is the time to talk to your salespeople, your customer service folks, your engineers, and product people.

Once your list is complete, rate each from 1 (snoozer) to 5 (critical problem that affects the livelihood of the audience).

You have to choose. This is what Zig Ziglar calls being “meaningful specific.” If you are “meaningful broad,” you’ll never be relevant enough. You have to decide on the customer pain point where you can help and make a real impact on your customer (or future customer).


Don’t become a wandering generality. Be a meaningful specific says @TheZigZiglar via @cmicontent
Click To Tweet


How do you know?

If you are struggling to know whether you are specific enough, just ask yourself the following question, “If we delivered compelling and relevant content on a consistent basis to our target audience around this topic over a long period, could we become the leading informational providers in the world around that topic?”

If the answer is no, you are not specific enough. Period.

Connecting to create your sweet spot

Now, match the areas which have a 5 – from your knowledge and skill side – with the customer pain points that have a 5. After going through this exercise, you’ll uncover a few areas that you can seriously run with. You’ll also probably discover that what you had been creating content around is not even close to being “meaningful specific.”

Understanding the model

Why is this model important? Your business might have a knowledge area that may not be relevant to customers. For example, a number of General Electric executives are knowledgeable in business strategy. GE’s internal training programs are some of the most famous ever developed by a corporation. That said, that knowledge may not translate into solving a GE customer’s issue or pain point. So GE’s knowledge of business strategy doesn’t necessarily align with the targeted customer’s pain point and doesn’t work for the sweet spot model.

Doug Kessler, co-founder of content agency Velocity Partners, believes the sweet spot is three-dimensional. It’s important to know the exact size, shape, and depth. As he details:

  • Size – Your sweet spot should be a focused area, with as tight a focus as possible without leaving stuff out.
  • Shape – You need to know exactly where your expertise reaches and where it stops. Just because you have knowledge in certain areas doesn’t mean that authority naturally extends to other areas.
  • Depth – Your expertise goes as deeply as it needs to go; you don’t have to pretend it goes deeper.

Going the distance

Whether you are just starting out with a content marketing strategy for a new audience or retrofitting an old strategy with new thinking, I believe this exercise is worth doing. As my partner-in-crime Robert Rose says at the end of every This Old Marketing podcast, “It’s your story to tell … tell it well.” Find a story that’s worth telling … your unique story that is meaningful to a particular audience. Be extreme!

For regular insight, practical advice, and helpful exercises from Joe Pulizzi and other experts in content marketing, subscribe to the free daily or weekly CMI blog.

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute

The post Finding Your Sweet Spot – An Extreme Content Focus [Exercise] appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

Dave Kerpen - InstagramYou Can’t Fake Authenticity

While technology and the way we communicate evolves at a rapid pace, there are some things that stay the same. Mainly, the importance of people skills. This is true for both people and businesses alike. Even the most well thought-out and perfectly executed social plan can fall flat if it loses sight of the essential humanity of its audience.

Dave has authored several best-selling books on the art of social. This body of work has now culminated in a book that addresses the very foundation of social, both online and off: people. Human beings manage social and human beings receive social. Yet somehow that human element can be forgotten amongst the plans, posts, and KPIs. Dave is here to bring us back to basics and get your social off the screen and into the heart of your customers.

In This Episode

  • How being interested (as opposed to interesting) leads to a more memorable and authentic customer experience
  • Why being happy doesn’t mean being right
  • How studying people skills leads to learning a new art
  • Why a single page business plan means more engaged and effective employee advocacy
  • How two simple questions lead to a deeper relationship within minutes

 

Quotes From This Episode

“Really get to know your audience and be super interested in who they are as individuals. They are going to be interested in you because of the fact that you’re interested in them.” —@DaveKerpen

“You’ve got to meet unhappy customers where they are and put yourself in their shoes.” —@DaveKerpen (highlight to tweet)

“There is an art and a science to both social media and people skills.” —@DaveKerpen (highlight to tweet)

“If you don’t have a business plan that you can put on one sheet of paper, then there’s a problem.” —@DaveKerpen

“If you can give people the right awesomeness, you’re going to change their lives and help your bottom line.” —@DaveKerpen

Resources

 

See you next week!

       

Dave Kerpen - InstagramYou Can’t Fake Authenticity

While technology and the way we communicate evolves at a rapid pace, there are some things that stay the same. Mainly, the importance of people skills. This is true for both people and businesses alike. Even the most well thought-out and perfectly executed social plan can fall flat if it loses sight of the essential humanity of its audience.

Dave has authored several best-selling books on the art of social. This body of work has now culminated in a book that addresses the very foundation of social, both online and off: people. Human beings manage social and human beings receive social. Yet somehow that human element can be forgotten amongst the plans, posts, and KPIs. Dave is here to bring us back to basics and get your social off the screen and into the heart of your customers.

In This Episode

  • How being interested (as opposed to interesting) leads to a more memorable and authentic customer experience
  • Why being happy doesn’t mean being right
  • How studying people skills leads to learning a new art
  • Why a single page business plan means more engaged and effective employee advocacy
  • How two simple questions lead to a deeper relationship within minutes

 

Quotes From This Episode

“Really get to know your audience and be super interested in who they are as individuals. They are going to be interested in you because of the fact that you’re interested in them.” —@DaveKerpen

“You’ve got to meet unhappy customers where they are and put yourself in their shoes.” —@DaveKerpen (highlight to tweet)

“There is an art and a science to both social media and people skills.” —@DaveKerpen (highlight to tweet)

“If you don’t have a business plan that you can put on one sheet of paper, then there’s a problem.” —@DaveKerpen

“If you can give people the right awesomeness, you’re going to change their lives and help your bottom line.” —@DaveKerpen

Resources

 

See you next week!

       

I Need Your Help Today

by Feed Engine

I Need Your Help Today

My new book, Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers launches today and I need your help.

If you haven’t purchased a copy yet (many of you have, thank you!) please do so today at Amazon.

Why I Wrote This Book

Through our consulting practice here at Convince & Convert, my colleagues and I discovered that customer service is being disrupted in the same ways and for the same reasons that marketing has been disrupted – mobile, Millennials, social media.

There are hundreds of books on marketing disruption (4 from me), but Hug Your Haters is the first and only book about customer service disruption.

Why the Book is Different

Most business books are based on advice and anecdote (including my previous works). It’s essentially some form of, “I do this all the time. You don’t, so trust me when I tell you what to do.”

But that won’t work in customer service. Why? Because you don’t think you need a book on customer service, do you? But you do.

80% of companies say they deliver superior customer service. 8% of their customers agree. (highlight to tweet)

Screenshot_2_27_16,_12_49_PMSo to help me convince readers that they needed to fundamentally change everything about their customer service and customer experience programs, I partnered with Edison Research on a massive study on the Science of Complaints. Just about everything in this book is backed up by serious research. These are facts, not suggestions.

Why this Isn’t the Book I Thought I Was Going to Write

I started out to write a book about speed. My thesis was that speed is the killer differentiator in today’s right now society. But based on the research I conducted with Edison, I discovered that speed is important, but not most important.

The most important element of modern customer service is just showing up.

About 1/3 of all customer complaints are ignored today, and most of those are online and in public. That’s both a huge problem and an enormous opportunity. So, I wrote a book about how to make that work, for every business. Will you consider buying a copy today?

Every copy of Hug Your Haters includes The Hatrix – a poster that showcases the most important data. And, the book includes a quick reference guide so you can easily refer back to the main points over time.

Why this Book is For You

I very carefully selected the examples, interviews, case studies, and research in Hug Your Haters so that it is relevant to all audiences. There are B2B examples and B2C examples. There are examples from US companies, and examples from around the world. There are big company examples, and small company examples.

Here’s just a little bit of what it includes:

1. The two types of Haters and what they want from you when they complain

2. How to handle trolls

3. How to measure customer service the right way

4. The precise customer loyalty impacts of answering complaints (or not answering) by channel

5. Why you need to answer every complaint, in every channel, every time

6. A specific framework for exactly how to answer private complaints

7. A specific framework for exactly how to answer public complaints

8. Where you should spend most of your time in social media

9. How fast you need to be when responding to customers, by channel

10. The future of customer service, including specialized apps and new technologies

11. Software recommendations for handling online and offline customer service for both small and large businesses

Please Do It Today

HYH-2If you buy the book today and send me your receipt at Jay@JayBaer.com you’ll get access to a lot of great bonuses including $200 off my forthcoming Keep Your Customers course.

You can also get a personal invitation to the amazing Hug Your Haters Facebook group that is already the #1 online community for customer service and customer experience.

And there are a ton of other bonus content opportunities for you too. Go to HugYourHaters.com to see them all.

Customer Service IS the New Marketing

I want to help you dominate customer service the same way I’ve been helping you dominate marketing for years and years.

My team and I publish 600 blog posts per year, 250 podcasts per year, and 200 curated emails per year. All for free, and all for amazing friends, marketers, customer service pros, and business owners like you.

Now, I need your help. Please buy Hug Your Haters today.

My Guarantee to You

Find out why Guy Kawasaki says Hug Your Haters is a “Landmark book in the history of customer service.”

If you buy the book and don’t like it, I’ll personally refund your money.

Thank you as always for always having my back. I don’t take it lightly and I don’t take it for granted.

Keep on hugging!

       

I Need Your Help Today

by Feed Engine

I Need Your Help Today

My new book, Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers launches today and I need your help.

If you haven’t purchased a copy yet (many of you have, thank you!) please do so today at Amazon.

Why I Wrote This Book

Through our consulting practice here at Convince & Convert, my colleagues and I discovered that customer service is being disrupted in the same ways and for the same reasons that marketing has been disrupted – mobile, Millennials, social media.

There are hundreds of books on marketing disruption (4 from me), but Hug Your Haters is the first and only book about customer service disruption.

Why the Book is Different

Most business books are based on advice and anecdote (including my previous works). It’s essentially some form of, “I do this all the time. You don’t, so trust me when I tell you what to do.”

But that won’t work in customer service. Why? Because you don’t think you need a book on customer service, do you? But you do.

80% of companies say they deliver superior customer service. 8% of their customers agree. (highlight to tweet)

Screenshot_2_27_16,_12_49_PMSo to help me convince readers that they needed to fundamentally change everything about their customer service and customer experience programs, I partnered with Edison Research on a massive study on the Science of Complaints. Just about everything in this book is backed up by serious research. These are facts, not suggestions.

Why this Isn’t the Book I Thought I Was Going to Write

I started out to write a book about speed. My thesis was that speed is the killer differentiator in today’s right now society. But based on the research I conducted with Edison, I discovered that speed is important, but not most important.

The most important element of modern customer service is just showing up.

About 1/3 of all customer complaints are ignored today, and most of those are online and in public. That’s both a huge problem and an enormous opportunity. So, I wrote a book about how to make that work, for every business. Will you consider buying a copy today?

Every copy of Hug Your Haters includes The Hatrix – a poster that showcases the most important data. And, the book includes a quick reference guide so you can easily refer back to the main points over time.

Why this Book is For You

I very carefully selected the examples, interviews, case studies, and research in Hug Your Haters so that it is relevant to all audiences. There are B2B examples and B2C examples. There are examples from US companies, and examples from around the world. There are big company examples, and small company examples.

Here’s just a little bit of what it includes:

1. The two types of Haters and what they want from you when they complain

2. How to handle trolls

3. How to measure customer service the right way

4. The precise customer loyalty impacts of answering complaints (or not answering) by channel

5. Why you need to answer every complaint, in every channel, every time

6. A specific framework for exactly how to answer private complaints

7. A specific framework for exactly how to answer public complaints

8. Where you should spend most of your time in social media

9. How fast you need to be when responding to customers, by channel

10. The future of customer service, including specialized apps and new technologies

11. Software recommendations for handling online and offline customer service for both small and large businesses

Please Do It Today

HYH-2If you buy the book today and send me your receipt at Jay@JayBaer.com you’ll get access to a lot of great bonuses including $200 off my forthcoming Keep Your Customers course.

You can also get a personal invitation to the amazing Hug Your Haters Facebook group that is already the #1 online community for customer service and customer experience.

And there are a ton of other bonus content opportunities for you too. Go to HugYourHaters.com to see them all.

Customer Service IS the New Marketing

I want to help you dominate customer service the same way I’ve been helping you dominate marketing for years and years.

My team and I publish 600 blog posts per year, 250 podcasts per year, and 200 curated emails per year. All for free, and all for amazing friends, marketers, customer service pros, and business owners like you.

Now, I need your help. Please buy Hug Your Haters today.

My Guarantee to You

Find out why Guy Kawasaki says Hug Your Haters is a “Landmark book in the history of customer service.”

If you buy the book and don’t like it, I’ll personally refund your money.

Thank you as always for always having my back. I don’t take it lightly and I don’t take it for granted.

Keep on hugging!