This Week in Realtime Media

All week long, we have been covering Social Media Week in New York City on our blog and across the Zignal Labs social channels. Here is a look at what is driving the conversation in The City so Nice, They Named it Twice.

Total Mentions

Since kicking off on Monday night at the opening reception, #SMWNYC conversation has generated over 26,000 mentions, averaging 161 mentions per hour. The highest spikes in volume occurred on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday:

Keynote Addresses

With the keynotes kicking off on Tuesday morning, much of the conversation centered around who was giving presentations. Among Tuesday’s speakers, it was opening speaker, Mark Thompson of The New York Times, that made the most noise:

Looking at the timeframe just after his keynote, four of the five most popular tweets stemmed from what he delivered…



…and our Newsroom picked up 98 stories about Mark Thompson from 10:45 AM to 11:00 AM:

For The New York Times CEO, “Pivoting an Icon” appears to be a successful keynote address. Based on the mention volume and the responses displayed across the web and social media, the presentation on how the publication prepared to succeed in the digital age resonated with those in the audience and beyond.

Pizza Rules the Internet

On Wednesday, it was a panel discussion with the team at BuzzFeed that got the conversation going. While nostalgia, animals, and emojis were all mentioned as some of the most popular trends on social media, food (namely pizza) took the top spot.

As soon as it was expressed that “Pizza Rules the Internet,” the crowd at Social Media Week immediately took note. In fact, the pizza emoji was at the center of our #SMWNYC Emoji Cloud for the entirety of Wednesday:

Facebook Reactions

Another hot topic to come out of Day 3? Facebook Reactions:

itemeditorimage_56ce3f270f161

News of Reactions replacing the ‘Like’ button on Facebook broke early Wednesday morning, and the story remained hot among #SMWNYC crowds throughout the day.

By midday, the majority of the most popular tweets around the event focused on the launch of the new Facebook feature:

It may be too soon to tell what the reaction to Facebook Reactions looks like. However, news of this major release by the social media site will most likely continue to circulate among the #SMWNYC crowd and beyond as they are used more and more.

#DisruptSocialSMW

The largest spike in mention volume occurred on Thursday afternoon, following a panel discussion with NASDAQ and TheSocialArchitects.

Named the #1 must see event at #SMWNYC, the panel seemed to live up to all of the hype based on how many people were talking about it.

The event’s official hashtag dominated all of the Social Media Week Hashtags…

…with more than 1,300 mentions on Thursday alone.

 

Additionally, the NASDAQ-sponsored event prompted a full-on discussion the stock exchange. Among #SMWNYC event venues, NASDAQ was the clear winner in mentions:

Subscribe now to get the full This Week in Realtime Media delivered directly to your inbox. See you next week!

       

This Week in Realtime Media

All week long, we have been covering Social Media Week in New York City on our blog and across the Zignal Labs social channels. Here is a look at what is driving the conversation in The City so Nice, They Named it Twice.

Total Mentions

Since kicking off on Monday night at the opening reception, #SMWNYC conversation has generated over 26,000 mentions, averaging 161 mentions per hour. The highest spikes in volume occurred on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday:

Keynote Addresses

With the keynotes kicking off on Tuesday morning, much of the conversation centered around who was giving presentations. Among Tuesday’s speakers, it was opening speaker, Mark Thompson of The New York Times, that made the most noise:

Looking at the timeframe just after his keynote, four of the five most popular tweets stemmed from what he delivered…



…and our Newsroom picked up 98 stories about Mark Thompson from 10:45 AM to 11:00 AM:

For The New York Times CEO, “Pivoting an Icon” appears to be a successful keynote address. Based on the mention volume and the responses displayed across the web and social media, the presentation on how the publication prepared to succeed in the digital age resonated with those in the audience and beyond.

Pizza Rules the Internet

On Wednesday, it was a panel discussion with the team at BuzzFeed that got the conversation going. While nostalgia, animals, and emojis were all mentioned as some of the most popular trends on social media, food (namely pizza) took the top spot.

As soon as it was expressed that “Pizza Rules the Internet,” the crowd at Social Media Week immediately took note. In fact, the pizza emoji was at the center of our #SMWNYC Emoji Cloud for the entirety of Wednesday:

Facebook Reactions

Another hot topic to come out of Day 3? Facebook Reactions:

itemeditorimage_56ce3f270f161

News of Reactions replacing the ‘Like’ button on Facebook broke early Wednesday morning, and the story remained hot among #SMWNYC crowds throughout the day.

By midday, the majority of the most popular tweets around the event focused on the launch of the new Facebook feature:

It may be too soon to tell what the reaction to Facebook Reactions looks like. However, news of this major release by the social media site will most likely continue to circulate among the #SMWNYC crowd and beyond as they are used more and more.

#DisruptSocialSMW

The largest spike in mention volume occurred on Thursday afternoon, following a panel discussion with NASDAQ and TheSocialArchitects.

Named the #1 must see event at #SMWNYC, the panel seemed to live up to all of the hype based on how many people were talking about it.

The event’s official hashtag dominated all of the Social Media Week Hashtags…

…with more than 1,300 mentions on Thursday alone.

 

Additionally, the NASDAQ-sponsored event prompted a full-on discussion the stock exchange. Among #SMWNYC event venues, NASDAQ was the clear winner in mentions:

Subscribe now to get the full This Week in Realtime Media delivered directly to your inbox. See you next week!

       

Governance Reporting

Making governance documents reader-friendly by using infographics, standardizing terms & major assumptions, ensuring relevance, and using interactive visualization

Read our related blog

 

Governance Reporting

Making governance documents reader-friendly by using infographics, standardizing terms & major assumptions, ensuring relevance, and using interactive visualization

Read our related blog

 

IBM Acq of Truven

IBM’s February 2016 announced plan to acquire Truven is yet another in a recent spate of healthcare market mergers/acquisitions. The Truven purchase, IBM’s fourth major acquisition since establishing Watson Health in 2014, offers IBM access to data integration and analytics services and solutions.

Visit the report page

 

IBM Acq of Truven

IBM’s February 2016 announced plan to acquire Truven is yet another in a recent spate of healthcare market mergers/acquisitions. The Truven purchase, IBM’s fourth major acquisition since establishing Watson Health in 2014, offers IBM access to data integration and analytics services and solutions.

Visit the report page

 

“The Global analyst firm Everest Group has released a comprehensive, 165 page report (available here) covering global service delivery locations, and the report cites Colombia as a nascent location in the global services market. While the country still has only a small share of the IT services market, for example, it is poised to…” Read more.

 

“The Global analyst firm Everest Group has released a comprehensive, 165 page report (available here) covering global service delivery locations, and the report cites Colombia as a nascent location in the global services market. While the country still has only a small share of the IT services market, for example, it is poised to…” Read more.

 

promote-e-book-cover

Marketers often pour their efforts, resources, and budgets into developing an e-book only to move on once the landing page is live. Your e-book could be the next game-changing, Content-Marketing-Award-winning, produce-into-a-major-motion-picture piece, but without promotion, nobody will click, download, read, or even see it.

Promoting an e-book goes beyond creating a landing page, tweeting a link, and emailing it to your customers. Those are the staple moves, much like serving turkey and dressing at Thanksgiving dinner.

Great e-book promotion touches all phases of the sales funnel and requires involvement from multiple teams within your organization. A collaborative, planned approach to e-book promotion not only generates leads, but it also catches the eyes of your best prospects. Here’s a look:

ebook-promotion-graphic

Top-of-funnel promotion

Your top-of-funnel efforts likely cast a wide net. You know some information about this audience so you can target accurately, but you don’t know them as well as you know your best customer. Therefore, this is the place to slice and dice your promotion the most. People digest content in different ways. The more you chop it up and share it, the more e-book buzz you’ll create.

Try these tactics, making sure that the e-book always is the call to action:

  • Record someone from your team reading the e-book and launch it as an audio book.
  • Launch a webinar with the author, featured thought leaders, or brands.
  • Create an infographic with the e-book’s tips, tricks, or quotes.
  • Create Twitter cards with quotes, stats, or tips from the e-book.
  • Turn each chapter into a blog post.
  • Contact influencers and ask them to share it (give them an exclusive sneak preview for even more exposure or buzz).
  • Include the e-book in two or three places on your website, such as the home page, resources section, and sidebar call-out.
  • Print it or put it on a USB drive and give it away at conferences, booth exhibits, etc.
  • Write email and phone scripts/outlines about your e-book for cold outreach by sales or business development representatives.

Middle-of-funnel promotion

If you generate a thought leadership, top-of-funnel e-book, you might think your promotion efforts stop at the top of the funnel. That is not the case. Other departments and audiences can benefit from your e-book, which will ultimately lead to revenue for your organization — which should be an end goal for you, too.

The middle of the funnel is where you get existing prospects to raise their hand and move closer to the sale. This is probably the toughest part of a marketer’s job. If you have great content and a strong reach, it’s not hard to get net new leads into your database. A simple download is all you need to get the process started. However, to get those leads to commit to a demo or free trial takes more work. Your e-book can help.

Consider these middle-of-funnel ideas:

  • Work the e-book into your nurture program(s) or drip campaigns.
  • Create a content pack for existing prospects, including a case study, e-book, one-sheet, etc.
  • Include the e-book in your newsletters.
  • Provide the e-book to employees in many ways so it’s easy to access and share, including:
    • Post or file on team collaboration platform
    • Link to landing page
    • Give direct link to e-book (e.g., after-form complete page or PDF link)
    • Shelve in content library
  • Ask partners to send it to shared partners and networks.
  • Print it or put it on a USB drive and include it in a care package to customers and prospects.
  • Enter your e-book in marketing contests.

Bottom-of-funnel promotion

The bottom of the funnel is where sales takes the lead. Imagine the funnel as a road, and you’re driving down it. As a marketer, you’re in the driver’s seat for the top and middle of the funnel. You control the content, the message, the promotional approach, etc. When you reach the bottom of the funnel, the salesperson takes the wheel. The salesperson is in charge of closing that deal. However, you don’t hop out of the car, you get in the back seat. You can still help, and that e-book is your admission ticket. Here are some ideas to support bottom-of-funnel promotion:

  • Attach the e-book to first-call presentation decks.
  • Use it to develop email or phone scripts and templates for existing prospect outreach.
  • Print it and give it to salespeople as takeaways or leave-behinds for meetings.

Don’t get overwhelmed – think of this post as a tapas menu, where you can pick and choose the tactics that work for you. As you promote your e-book, you’ll quickly learn what works (and what doesn’t work). From there, you can hone in and focus on the successful tactics. Soon, you’ll have a well-oiled machine for not only creating great e-books, but also for getting them out there for the world to see and devour.

We’re following Amanda’s advice. Check out a wealth of content marketing resources in the Content Marketing Institute e-book library, from The Essentials of a Documented Content Marketing Strategy to Digital Governance: A Primer for Content Marketers.

Cover image via pixabay.com

The post 22 Ways to Promote Your E-Book appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

promote-e-book-cover

Marketers often pour their efforts, resources, and budgets into developing an e-book only to move on once the landing page is live. Your e-book could be the next game-changing, Content-Marketing-Award-winning, produce-into-a-major-motion-picture piece, but without promotion, nobody will click, download, read, or even see it.

Promoting an e-book goes beyond creating a landing page, tweeting a link, and emailing it to your customers. Those are the staple moves, much like serving turkey and dressing at Thanksgiving dinner.

Great e-book promotion touches all phases of the sales funnel and requires involvement from multiple teams within your organization. A collaborative, planned approach to e-book promotion not only generates leads, but it also catches the eyes of your best prospects. Here’s a look:

ebook-promotion-graphic

Top-of-funnel promotion

Your top-of-funnel efforts likely cast a wide net. You know some information about this audience so you can target accurately, but you don’t know them as well as you know your best customer. Therefore, this is the place to slice and dice your promotion the most. People digest content in different ways. The more you chop it up and share it, the more e-book buzz you’ll create.

Try these tactics, making sure that the e-book always is the call to action:

  • Record someone from your team reading the e-book and launch it as an audio book.
  • Launch a webinar with the author, featured thought leaders, or brands.
  • Create an infographic with the e-book’s tips, tricks, or quotes.
  • Create Twitter cards with quotes, stats, or tips from the e-book.
  • Turn each chapter into a blog post.
  • Contact influencers and ask them to share it (give them an exclusive sneak preview for even more exposure or buzz).
  • Include the e-book in two or three places on your website, such as the home page, resources section, and sidebar call-out.
  • Print it or put it on a USB drive and give it away at conferences, booth exhibits, etc.
  • Write email and phone scripts/outlines about your e-book for cold outreach by sales or business development representatives.

Middle-of-funnel promotion

If you generate a thought leadership, top-of-funnel e-book, you might think your promotion efforts stop at the top of the funnel. That is not the case. Other departments and audiences can benefit from your e-book, which will ultimately lead to revenue for your organization — which should be an end goal for you, too.

The middle of the funnel is where you get existing prospects to raise their hand and move closer to the sale. This is probably the toughest part of a marketer’s job. If you have great content and a strong reach, it’s not hard to get net new leads into your database. A simple download is all you need to get the process started. However, to get those leads to commit to a demo or free trial takes more work. Your e-book can help.

Consider these middle-of-funnel ideas:

  • Work the e-book into your nurture program(s) or drip campaigns.
  • Create a content pack for existing prospects, including a case study, e-book, one-sheet, etc.
  • Include the e-book in your newsletters.
  • Provide the e-book to employees in many ways so it’s easy to access and share, including:
    • Post or file on team collaboration platform
    • Link to landing page
    • Give direct link to e-book (e.g., after-form complete page or PDF link)
    • Shelve in content library
  • Ask partners to send it to shared partners and networks.
  • Print it or put it on a USB drive and include it in a care package to customers and prospects.
  • Enter your e-book in marketing contests.

Bottom-of-funnel promotion

The bottom of the funnel is where sales takes the lead. Imagine the funnel as a road, and you’re driving down it. As a marketer, you’re in the driver’s seat for the top and middle of the funnel. You control the content, the message, the promotional approach, etc. When you reach the bottom of the funnel, the salesperson takes the wheel. The salesperson is in charge of closing that deal. However, you don’t hop out of the car, you get in the back seat. You can still help, and that e-book is your admission ticket. Here are some ideas to support bottom-of-funnel promotion:

  • Attach the e-book to first-call presentation decks.
  • Use it to develop email or phone scripts and templates for existing prospect outreach.
  • Print it and give it to salespeople as takeaways or leave-behinds for meetings.

Don’t get overwhelmed – think of this post as a tapas menu, where you can pick and choose the tactics that work for you. As you promote your e-book, you’ll quickly learn what works (and what doesn’t work). From there, you can hone in and focus on the successful tactics. Soon, you’ll have a well-oiled machine for not only creating great e-books, but also for getting them out there for the world to see and devour.

We’re following Amanda’s advice. Check out a wealth of content marketing resources in the Content Marketing Institute e-book library, from The Essentials of a Documented Content Marketing Strategy to Digital Governance: A Primer for Content Marketers.

Cover image via pixabay.com

The post 22 Ways to Promote Your E-Book appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.